Webinar on Careers in Law conducted by NIMT - A Review

On 8 August 2020, NIMT conducted a webinar on the topic of career prospects and opportunities in the sphere of law. The webinar was jointly organised by NIMT Institute of Method & Law, Greater Noida, and NIMT Technical and Professional College, Kotputli. The webinar commenced at 11:30 AM and went on for almost 2 and half hours, surpassing the scheduled time frame owing to certain technical issues faced from time to time, finally ending at around 2 PM.

The five honourable guest speakers present in the webinar, in alphabetical order, were:

  1. Advocate Abdul Qadir Abbasi – Advocate on Record, Supreme Court of India (SCI).
  2. Dr. K.P. Singh – Chairman of NIMT Educational Institutions.
  3. Nandita S. Jha – Assistant Professor cum UGC Coordinator/Special Officer at Chanakya National University.
  4. Dr. Naresh Mahipal – Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi.
  5. Prof. Dr. R Venkata Rao – Former VC, National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru.

The webinar was moderated by Mr. Siddhant Singh, Director at NIMT, who began proceedings by thanking and introducing the respective guest speakers. Next, Mr. Singh gave a brief overview of NIMT, its campuses, the courses it offers, the government. affiliations it has acquired, etc.

The first guest speaker to inaugurate the session was Dr. R. Venkata Rao, who threw light on careers in law in India. He explained how before 1980, law had not received the importance it enjoys today in India. But over time, careers in law have developed in scope and recognition and they are only going to increase in the future. After 1991, as the Indian economy became more liberal, privatised and globalised, legal openings grew in the job market. Dr. Rao emphasised how in the 21st century, with the mushrooming of legal outsourcers, law firms, Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) professionals, etc., law aspirants have the pleasant headache of choosing from various highly lucrative career options.

The next speaker, Nandita Jha, stressed on the importance of law students and aspirants in making the ultimate career decisions for themselves. She said that while there are plenty of opportunities available on the job front, it is the responsibility of law aspirants to have a specific goal in mind and work hard to realize that goal. Be it civil law, corporate law, or judiciary posts, aspirants must categorise their internships according to their goals. Dr. Jha spoke on the importance of work experience in the form of internships for law students. Searching for institutions that boast a strong alumni base, who have gone to Harvard, Oxford or other world-renowned institutes to further careers is the key. But ultimately, it all boils down to the hard work and commitment of every aspirant that will guarantee them a great career in law.

Dr. Naresh Mahipal was the third speaker in the webinar. He began by acknowledging the problems faced by law students and aspirants when deciding on a definite career path. Dr. Mahipal paid homage to law by saying that a man devoting his life to law is useful to himself, his family and the society at large. Also, when it comes to a career in law, Dr. Mahipal stated, it’s not bookish knowledge but competency and consistency that are the two key elements. Elaborating on the benefits of a law career, he said that it is a highly rewarding prospect, for there is no room for monotony, job security is assured, and social respectability is also earned. Moreover, law is a crucial component in other major fields like politics, business and academics. Speaking on formal law education at length, Dr. Mahipal said that usually there are three-year and five-year law courses offered by colleges and universities. Like the integrated BA LLB course, many higher education institutes also offer B.Com LLB and B.Sc LLB degrees. After graduation, diploma courses are also available to pursue in specialised fields such as human rights, cyber law and environmental law. Apart from competitive admission tests like CLAT, many institutes conduct their own entrance examinations like Amity Law School, IP University in Delhi, Symbiosis Pune or KUK MDU in Rohtak. Other institutes such as NIMT offer admission based on merit or on a first-come, first-served basis. Dr. Mahipal followed his discourse on the different law education programmes by speaking on the diverse law careers aspirants can opt for after getting admission in colleges and universities. He said that a lawyer can practise as an advocate in Subordinate Courts, High Courts, or even the Supreme Court, depending on his or her educational and training qualifications. One can join Legal Process Outsourcing (LPO) companies or law firms, gain specialised knowledge in fields like real estate, patent law, corporate law, etc. Judiciary is another field that young law graduates can pursue. There are exams for aspirants wanting to be Public Prosecutors. Those who are keen to teach law must pass the NET exam and also have an LLM degree. Dr. Mahipal ended his discussion by reminding law aspirants that although law as a career sounds very lucrative and attractive, certain important qualities like good oral and written communication skills, logical reasoning and objective thinking, must be constantly cultivated. A good lawyer must also be fond of reading research, Dr. Mahipal argues, and learn how to be presentable, confident and articulate.

The extremely detailed and insightful lecture by Dr. Mahipal was followed by an address by the chairman of NIMT Educational Institutions, Dr. K.P. Singh. The latter mainly spoke on the importance and necessity of law in all aspects of life. He said that the awareness of law is imperative for all, from the poorest of farmers, to the richest business magnates of the world. Dr. Singh, like his preceding speakers, highlighted the 1991 economic reforms as a watershed moment in India’s history that forever changed the scope of national and international law engagements in India. There is an abundance of legal opportunities in the modern world for which law students must be adequately prepared for by providing them state-of-the-art education and training.

A Q&A session ensued after four of the five honourable guest speakers had their say. A list of most frequently asked queries of law scholars and graduates had been prepared beforehand for the speakers to address.

Nandita Jha opined on the possibility of a career in civil services for law graduates. She said that a career in civil law is an opportunity available to every law aspirant. Like Dr. Mahipal had pointed out, Nandita Jha also emphasised on aspirants’ reasoning faculties and articulation being important qualities besides their degrees that make for excellent openings in civil services.

On the subject of preparation for judiciary as a career after law, Dr. K.P. Singh said that NIMT provides judiciary coaching services to law students in both its Greater Noida and Kotputli campuses. Aspirants must also be thoroughly learned, Dr. Singh stressed, in the judiciary guidelines of different states.

Then, both Dr. Singh and Dr. R. Venkata Rao spoke on law as a pedagogical subject. Dr. Rao said that besides litigation and corporate jobs, teaching law and the various branches thereof is also professionally gratifying and lucrative. Dr. Singh made an eye-opening remark when he said that many law education institutes in India offer one-year LLM courses, when it is no secret that universities often refuse one-year-long LLM degree holders, preferring the standard two-year degree as an eligible qualification. Dr. Singh urged that the Bar Council of India must take cognisance of the matter and ensure that a uniformity is maintained when such an important law degree is under scrutiny.

Manoj Rana, Assistant Professor of Law at NIMT, Greater Noida, then asked the panel a question frequently asked by his students. His question sought to understand the reason behind the emergence of courses like B.Sc LLB or B.Com LLB, when BA LLB has been normative for so many years. Dr. Naresh Mahipal resolved this query by saying that it all depends on specialised knowledge requirements. He instantiated B.Com LLB where taxation law is a common subject of enquiry. He explained that these courses have been designed by keeping in mind the disciplinary background of students in school, i.e. whether they opted for Arts, Science or Commerce after class X.

The fifth and final speaker in the webinar, Advocate Abdul Qadir Abbasi, then gave his views on career prospects in litigation. He said that the 5-year integrated law courses are very fruitful because he has seen that candidates passing out from these courses show great potential in whichever legal field they opt for. He then reminded all that in any law career, aspirants have to encounter struggle and financial hardship. But their labours soon bear fruit as long as they continue to fight for justice. Talking about unprecedented opportunities in law as a career, Advocate Abbasi drew attention to the new phenomenon that is IBC, or Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, which was implemented in India in 2016. Resolution professional exams conducted by NCIT enable aspirants to explore their career possibilities in IBC. Advocate Abbasi also spoke on the advantages and responsibilities of being an advocate by saying how only advocates are allowed to file cases in the Supreme Court, regardless of who has undertaken the drafting and research procedures.

The Q&A session resumed with a few questions asked to Advocate Abbasi immediately after he had concluded his lecture. Addressing the question of whether a litigator can practise different areas of law like medicolegal and human rights law at the same time, Abbasi replied that yes, one can. The Bar Council of India does not impose any restrictions on the simultaneous practise of different law areas. The only stipulation is that in such a case, the litigator can limit himself to law practice only, and not associate himself with any other kind of legal job, for that would be unlawful.

Addressing another frequently asked question, viz. which is more useful, general LLM or specialised LLM, Advocate Abbasi said that acquiring a specialised LLM from a reputed institute abroad usually helps in becoming a High Court lawyer. Law firms and financial institutions also look for candidates with specialised LLMs. Otherwise, it makes no difference.

The final topic of discussion in the webinar was IPR, i.e. laws related to intellectual property. Nandita Jha explained that Intellectual Property Rights is a compulsory area of study in all LLB courses, as per BCI guidelines. In the 7th semester, students of integrated law programmes can also opt for IPR as a special choice of paper. Employment opportunities in On 8 August 2020, NIMT conducted a webinar on the topic of career prospects and opportunities in the sphere of law. The webinar was jointly organised by NIMT Institute of Method & Law, Greater Noida, and NIMT Technical and Professional College, Kotputli. The webinar commenced at 11:30 AM and went on for almost 2 and half hours, surpassing the scheduled time frame owing to certain technical issues faced from time to time, finally ending at around 2 PM.

The five honourable guest speakers present in the webinar, in alphabetical order, were:

  1. Advocate Abdul Qadir Abbasi – Advocate on Record, Supreme Court of India (SCI).
  2. Dr. K.P. Singh – Chairman of NIMT Educational Institutions.
  3. Nandita S. Jha – Assistant Professor cum UGC Coordinator/Special Officer at Chanakya National University.
  4. Dr. Naresh Mahipal – Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi.
  5. Prof. Dr. R Venkata Rao – Former VC, National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru.

The webinar was moderated by Mr. Siddhant Singh, Director at NIMT, who began proceedings by thanking and introducing the respective guest speakers. Next, Mr. Singh gave a brief overview of NIMT, its campuses, the courses it offers, the government. affiliations it has acquired, etc.

The first guest speaker to inaugurate the session was Dr. R. Venkata Rao, who threw light on careers in law in India. He explained how before 1980, law had not received the importance it enjoys today in India. But over time, careers in law have developed in scope and recognition and they are only going to increase in the future. After 1991, as the Indian economy became more liberal, privatised and globalised, legal openings grew in the job market. Dr. Rao emphasised how in the 21st century, with the mushrooming of legal outsourcers, law firms, Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) professionals, etc., law aspirants have the pleasant headache of choosing from various highly lucrative career options.

The next speaker, Nandita Jha, stressed on the importance of law students and aspirants in making the ultimate career decisions for themselves. She said that while there are plenty of opportunities available on the job front, it is the responsibility of law aspirants to have a specific goal in mind and work hard to realize that goal. Be it civil law, corporate law, or judiciary posts, aspirants must categorise their internships according to their goals. Dr. Jha spoke on the importance of work experience in the form of internships for law students. Searching for institutions that boast a strong alumni base, who have gone to Harvard, Oxford or other world-renowned institutes to further careers is the key. But ultimately, it all boils down to the hard work and commitment of every aspirant that will guarantee them a great career in law.

Dr. Naresh Mahipal was the third speaker in the webinar. He began by acknowledging the problems faced by law students and aspirants when deciding on a definite career path. Dr. Mahipal paid homage to law by saying that a man devoting his life to law is useful to himself, his family and the society at large. Also, when it comes to a career in law, Dr. Mahipal stated, it’s not bookish knowledge but competency and consistency that are the two key elements. Elaborating on the benefits of a law career, he said that it is a highly rewarding prospect, for there is no room for monotony, job security is assured, and social respectability is also earned. Moreover, law is a crucial component in other major fields like politics, business and academics. Speaking on formal law education at length, Dr. Mahipal said that usually there are three-year and five-year law courses offered by colleges and universities. Like the integrated BA LLB course, many higher education institutes also offer B.Com LLB and B.Sc LLB degrees. After graduation, diploma courses are also available to pursue in specialised fields such as human rights, cyber law and environmental law. Apart from competitive admission tests like CLAT, many institutes conduct their own entrance examinations like Amity Law School, IP University in Delhi, Symbiosis Pune or KUK MDU in Rohtak. Other institutes such as NIMT offer admission based on merit or on a first-come, first-served basis. Dr. Mahipal followed his discourse on the different law education programmes by speaking on the diverse law careers aspirants can opt for after getting admission in colleges and universities. He said that a lawyer can practise as an advocate in Subordinate Courts, High Courts, or even the Supreme Court, depending on his or her educational and training qualifications. One can join Legal Process Outsourcing (LPO) companies or law firms, gain specialised knowledge in fields like real estate, patent law, corporate law, etc. Judiciary is another field that young law graduates can pursue. There are exams for aspirants wanting to be Public Prosecutors. Those who are keen to teach law must pass the NET exam and also have an LLM degree. Dr. Mahipal ended his discussion by reminding law aspirants that although law as a career sounds very lucrative and attractive, certain important qualities like good oral and written communication skills, logical reasoning and objective thinking, must be constantly cultivated. A good lawyer must also be fond of reading research, Dr. Mahipal argues, and learn how to be presentable, confident and articulate.

The extremely detailed and insightful lecture by Dr. Mahipal was followed by an address by the chairman of NIMT Educational Institutions, Dr. K.P. Singh. The latter mainly spoke on the importance and necessity of law in all aspects of life. He said that the awareness of law is imperative for all, from the poorest of farmers, to the richest business magnates of the world. Dr. Singh, like his preceding speakers, highlighted the 1991 economic reforms as a watershed moment in India’s history that forever changed the scope of national and international law engagements in India. There is an abundance of legal opportunities in the modern world for which law students must be adequately prepared for by providing them state-of-the-art education and training.

A Q&A session ensued after four of the five honourable guest speakers had their say. A list of most frequently asked queries of law scholars and graduates had been prepared beforehand for the speakers to address.

Nandita Jha opined on the possibility of a career in civil services for law graduates. She said that a career in civil law is an opportunity available to every law aspirant. Like Dr. Mahipal had pointed out, Nandita Jha also emphasised on aspirants’ reasoning faculties and articulation being important qualities besides their degrees that make for excellent openings in civil services.

On the subject of preparation for judiciary as a career after law, Dr. K.P. Singh said that NIMT provides judiciary coaching services to law students in both its Greater Noida and Kotputli campuses. Aspirants must also be thoroughly learned, Dr. Singh stressed, in the judiciary guidelines of different states.

Then, both Dr. Singh and Dr. R. Venkata Rao spoke on law as a pedagogical subject. Dr. Rao said that besides litigation and corporate jobs, teaching law and the various branches thereof is also professionally gratifying and lucrative. Dr. Singh made an eye-opening remark when he said that many law education institutes in India offer one-year LLM courses, when it is no secret that universities often refuse one-year-long LLM degree holders, preferring the standard two-year degree as an eligible qualification. Dr. Singh urged that the Bar Council of India must take cognisance of the matter and ensure that a uniformity is maintained when such an important law degree is under scrutiny.

Manoj Rana, Assistant Professor of Law at NIMT, Greater Noida, then asked the panel a question frequently asked by his students. His question sought to understand the reason behind the emergence of courses like B.Sc LLB or B.Com LLB, when BA LLB has been normative for so many years. Dr. Naresh Mahipal resolved this query by saying that it all depends on specialised knowledge requirements. He instantiated B.Com LLB where taxation law is a common subject of enquiry. He explained that these courses have been designed by keeping in mind the disciplinary background of students in school, i.e. whether they opted for Arts, Science or Commerce after class X.

The fifth and final speaker in the webinar, Advocate Abdul Qadir Abbasi, then gave his views on career prospects in litigation. He said that the 5-year integrated law courses are very fruitful because he has seen that candidates passing out from these courses show great potential in whichever legal field they opt for. He then reminded all that in any law career, aspirants have to encounter struggle and financial hardship. But their labours soon bear fruit as long as they continue to fight for justice. Talking about unprecedented opportunities in law as a career, Advocate Abbasi drew attention to the new phenomenon that is IBC, or Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, which was implemented in India in 2016. Resolution professional exams conducted by NCIT enable aspirants to explore their career possibilities in IBC. Advocate Abbasi also spoke on the advantages and responsibilities of being an advocate by saying how only advocates are allowed to file cases in the Supreme Court, regardless of who has undertaken the drafting and research procedures.

The Q&A session resumed with a few questions asked to Advocate Abbasi immediately after he had concluded his lecture. Addressing the question of whether a litigator can practise different areas of law like medicolegal and human rights law at the same time, Abbasi replied that yes, one can. The Bar Council of India does not impose any restrictions on the simultaneous practise of different law areas. The only stipulation is that in such a case, the litigator can limit himself to law practice only, and not associate himself with any other kind of legal job, for that would be unlawful.

Addressing another frequently asked question, viz. which is more useful, general LLM or specialised LLM, Advocate Abbasi said that acquiring a specialised LLM from a reputed institute abroad usually helps in becoming a High Court lawyer. Law firms and financial institutions also look for candidates with specialised LLMs. Otherwise, it makes no difference.

The final topic of discussion in the webinar was IPR, i.e. laws related to intellectual property. Nandita Jha explained that Intellectual Property Rights is a compulsory area of study in all LLB courses, as per BCI guidelines. In the 7th semester, students of integrated law programmes can also opt for IPR as a special choice of paper. Employment opportunities in IPR include becoming members of law firms and consultancy firms that deal with intellectual property rules and regulations.

All the speakers, in their closing remarks, concluded that it was a highly interactive, informative and enriching webinar for the students and aspirants attending it as well as the speakers themselves. It was unanimously agreed that law as a career was multidimensional in nature, providing job satisfaction, social respect and prosperity. Nandita Jha emphatically ended the webinar by reminding all law graduates and scholars that they must always remember three things to achieve success: focus, commitment, and belief.


IPR include becoming members of law firms and consultancy firms that deal with intellectual property rules and regulations.

All the speakers, in their closing remarks, concluded that it was a highly interactive, informative and enriching webinar for the students and aspirants attending it as well as the speakers themselves. It was unanimously agreed that law as a career was multidimensional in nature, providing job satisfaction, social respect and prosperity. Nandita Jha emphatically ended the webinar by reminding all law graduates and scholars that they must always remember three things to achieve success: focus, commitment, and belief.


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Blog Post written by:
Abhinav Roy
Intern
Related Courses
Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Laws (BA LLB) | Greater Noida
Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Laws (BA LLB) | Kotputli
Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Related Institutions
NIMT Technical and Professional College, Kotputli Jaipur
NIMT Vidhi Evam Kanun Sansthan (NIMT Institute of Method & Law), Greater Noida